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CIE Chromaticity Chart_650x464.jpg
Aug 24, 2017

What do integrators need to know about wide color gamut displays and content?

Distinguishing WCG from non-WCG The color gamut of a display is usually quantified in terms of the NTSC standard created in 1953. Most LCD displays on the market today are designed to meet the HDTV color gamut standard, known as Rec. 709 (or alternatively BT.709). Compared to the NTSC standard, the Rec. 709 color gamut covers roughly 72% of the NTSC color gamut. In display circles, we refer to the color gamut of a display using this percentage NTSC measurement, such as “72% NTSC,” which is the most common specification for LCD displays on the market. While there’s no formal definition for wide color gamut (WCG), anything above 72% NTSC is generally More…

LED Display , Wide Color Gamut , Display Content

Planar-4K-LCDs-Low-Res
Aug 17, 2017

What do integrators need to know about color subsampling?

In order to reduce the bandwidth necessary to transmit 4K content, the new HDMI 2.0 specification includes support for 4:2:0 subsampling. This reduces the color information in the signal by 75%, leading to a 50% reduction in bandwidth. Much of the video content currently available is already 4:2:0 subsampled, so there won’t be any additional degradation of the image as a result of the subsampling. However, in other content, such as PC graphics inputs, 4:2:0 subsampling can introduce significant image artifacts. This is especially noticeable in text. When selecting a product with 4K @ 60Hz support, integrators should be checking what color subsampling More…

4K , Planar UltraRes , Planar MediaPlex Plus

8K at NAB_650x433.jpg
Aug 10, 2017

8K Connectivity

Demand for high resolution across all displays is on the rise, explaining why industry attention today has moved beyond HD to 4K and Ultra HD displays with sights set on the 8K ecosystem ahead. So why not just add 4 times the pixels of Ultra HD call it a day? Unfortunately, the high data rate required for connectivity makes 8K resolution more complicated than simply adding pixels. Consider an 8K image may: display up to 120 frames per second (fps) require a minimum of 10 bit color require the color sub-sampling 4:4:4, 4:2:2, or 4:2:0 One common example of this is an RGB signal with 8K pixels, 10 bits of color, 4:2:0 color sub-sampling, and More…

8K , 4K , Ultra HD

HDCP_650x366.jpg
Aug 03, 2017

What do integrators need to know about HDCP 2.2?

Adding to the alphabet soup that is display specifications, HDCP stands for “High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection.” It was first developed by the Intel Corporation and is now ubiquitous across consumer video sources and displays as a way to protect copyrighted materials from privacy. According to the license holders at Digital Connection, HDCP “eliminates the possibility of intercepting digital data midstream between the source and the display” (like directing it to a recording device). It was first introduced for DVI in 2000 and has since gone through several iterations over the years. Each to support a broader range of devices and to overcome More…

Planar UltraRes , 4K displays , security