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4K-UHD-logo.png
Sep 07, 2017

What do integrators need to know about 4k content playback?

The amount of 4K video content available to be viewed remains relatively low. Netflix and Amazon Prime are currently the two best streaming sources, though the recent release of UHD Blu-ray opens the door for many more titles to become available in 4K. TV broadcasts in 4K are scheduled to start later this year. In the non-consumer world, PC applications dominate as content providers for 4K displays, as video graphics cards have supported 4k output for quite some time. 4K content requires substantially higher data rates than 1080p content. As a result, the existing H.264 / AVC compression algorithm traditionally used on various 1080p content simply More…

4K , 4K displays , Content

Planar-4K-LCDs-Low-Res
Aug 17, 2017

What do integrators need to know about color subsampling?

In order to reduce the bandwidth necessary to transmit 4K content, the new HDMI 2.0 specification includes support for 4:2:0 subsampling. This reduces the color information in the signal by 75%, leading to a 50% reduction in bandwidth. Much of the video content currently available is already 4:2:0 subsampled, so there won’t be any additional degradation of the image as a result of the subsampling. However, in other content, such as PC graphics inputs, 4:2:0 subsampling can introduce significant image artifacts. This is especially noticeable in text. When selecting a product with 4K @ 60Hz support, integrators should be checking what color subsampling More…

4K , Planar UltraRes , Planar MediaPlex Plus

8K at NAB_650x433.jpg
Aug 10, 2017

8K Connectivity

Demand for high resolution across all displays is on the rise, explaining why industry attention today has moved beyond HD to 4K and Ultra HD displays with sights set on the 8K ecosystem ahead. So why not just add 4 times the pixels of Ultra HD call it a day? Unfortunately, the high data rate required for connectivity makes 8K resolution more complicated than simply adding pixels. Consider an 8K image may: display up to 120 frames per second (fps) require a minimum of 10 bit color require the color sub-sampling 4:4:4, 4:2:2, or 4:2:0 One common example of this is an RGB signal with 8K pixels, 10 bits of color, 4:2:0 color sub-sampling, and More…

8K , 4K , Ultra HD

4k-product-line-html
Mar 09, 2016

4 Reasons to Buy a 4K Display

The decision to upgrade to a 4K display might not be an easy one. It wasn’t all that long ago that things moved from standard definition to HD and now there’s another move to an even higher resolution display. Here are 4 reasons to upgrade to a 4K Ultra-High Definition (UHD) display. 1. Multiple Inputs Since 4K displays are four-times the resolution of HD screens you can use the multiple inputs on a PlanarⓇ 4K monitor to show four different feeds at full resolution on one screen. So instead of trying to piece together the inputs on four different screens or figure out how to have your video sources switch between them all, you can do everything from More…

4K , 4K displays , Planar UltraRes , UltraRes , Ultra HD

4k-product-lineup-nobackground-logo_350px.png
Sep 09, 2015

What’s the Difference between 4K and UHD?

If you’re confused by the different labels for the newer displays out there, you’re not alone (and this isn’t a new thing). Usually technology develops faster than the labels that apply to it, but, multiple competing technologies might have different names until the standards are set. If you remember the confusion of figuring out what was HD, Full-HD, and 1080p, you get how the confusion of standards works. 4K vs. UHDIn a technical sense, 4K is the standard developed by cinema to express a resolution of 4096 by 2160. Which works out to an aspect ratio (the comparison of the width to the height) of 1.9:1. Since most movies are shot in the 1.9:1 aspect More…

Ultra HD , 4K displays , hdmi , 4K